Thursday, August 17, 2017

Film of session from Text and Data Mining symposium - Engineering Department at Cambridge University - August 2017

Blog description of symposium held at Cambridge on Text and Data Mining - Cambridge University
 https://unlockingresearch.blog.lib.cam.ac.uk/?p=1505

Sometimes the best way to find a solution is to just get the different stakeholders talking to each other – and this what happened at a recent Text and Data Mining symposium held in the Engineering Department at Cambridge. The attendees were primarily postgraduate students and early career researchers, but senior researchers, administrative staff, librarians and publishers were also represented in the audience. This symposium grew out of a discussion held earlier this year at Cambridge to consider the issue of TDM and what a TDM library service might look like at Cambridge.
The day concluded with the group reconvening together for a roundtable (which was filmed) to discuss the broader issue of why there is not more TDM happening in the UK
What was clear was something I have repeatedly observed over the past few years – that the players in this space including librarians, researchers and publishers, have very little idea of how the others work and their needs. I have actually heard people say: ‘If only they understood…’

Dr Danny Kingsley
Head, Office of Scholarly Communication
Cambridge University Library

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Center for Open Science Launches Thesis Commons, an Open-source Platform for Theses and Dissertations

Charlottesville, VA
The Center for Open Science (COS) is pleased to announce the release of Thesis Commons, a free, cloud-based, open-source platform for the submission, dissemination, and discovery of graduate and undergraduate theses and dissertations from any discipline. Authors can share their electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) with a quick and easy submission workflow.  Readers can search, discover, and download with a clean and simple interface. Institutions can sign-up for a branded version of the service for their institutional community for hosting ETDs, preprints, or other scholarship.  
Thesis Commons in part of  a rapidly growing community of open scholarly communication services built on an open-source infrastructure called the Open Science Framework (OSF).  As a shared, public good, the OSF dramatically lowers the barrier to entry for communities to introduce and operate services across the research lifecycle such as preprints, ETD repositories, and data or materials archives.  With a planned integration of a peer review service layer, communities will be able to moderate these services directly and operate discipline-specific repositories or journals with a common integrated infrastructure.  
COS aims to facilitate open and accessible scholarly communication services that promote community-driven innovation and customization in the scholarly workflow. “Thousands of researchers at hundreds of institutions are using the OSF to organize, collaborate, and improve discovery of active research projects,” said Matt Spitzer, COS Community Manager. “The OSF also enables open, community-led interfaces for sharing preprints and papers. Institutions are looking for more integrated, open-source services to host their community’s research outputs. By bringing Thesis Commons and institutionally-branded repositories together, we will dramatically improve discovery and reduce preservation costs.”
Thesis Commons has a steering committee of experts and advocates for open scholarship representing institution, library, and researcher stakeholder communities.  Members include Bradly Alicea from the OpenWorm Foundation, Gail Clement from the California Institute of Technology, John Finnell from Los Alamos Laboratory, Amanda French from GWU, Jon Grahe from Pacific Lutheran University, Sridhar Gutam from Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Chris Hartgerink from Tilburg University, Thea Lindquist from University of Colorado, Boulder, Gail McMillan from Virginia Tech, Gustav Nilsonne from Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, and Fred Smyth from the University of Virginia.
Thesis Commons is also backed by COS’s preservation fund, which ensures that all data stored on its services would be preserved and accessible for 50+ years in the event of COS curtailing or closing its services. Moreover, because all COS-built software is open-source, other groups could maintain and operate the service in COS’s absence.
For more information on Thesis Commons or to discuss implementation at your institution, please reach out to us here or contact Matt Spitzer at matt.spitzer@cos.io.
###
About Center for Open Science
The Center for Open Science (COS) is a non-profit technology startup founded in 2013 with a mission to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. COS pursues this mission by building communities around open science practices, supporting metascience research, and developing and maintaining free, open source software tools. The Open Science Framework (OSF), COS’s flagship product, is a web application that connects and supports the research workflow, enabling scientists to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of their research. Researchers use the OSF to collaborate, document, archive, share, and register research projects, materials, and data. Learn more at cos.io and osf.io.
Contacts for the Center for Open Science
Media: Rusty Speidel: rusty@cos.io | 434-284-3403
Starting a Branded Service: Matt Spitzer: matt.spitzer@cos.io

Blog Discussion: Planning scholarly communication training in the UK - June 2017

A new Blog on Unlocking Research from the U.K.

"Planning scholarly communication training in the UK”

A summary:


In June 2017 ,a group of people met in London to discuss the issues around scholarly communication training delivery in the UK. Representatives from RLUK, UKSG, SCONUL, UKCoRR, Vitae, Jisc and some universities had a workshop to discuss how to address the problem. Although the discussion was very library-centric, the need for  training outside the library sector is the emphasis of the blog discussion. This blog is a summary of the discussion from that day.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eSchoalrship for July 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for July 2017

Below is an overview of the number of views and downloads for this month, along with links to your usage numbers from previous months and additional data. We feel that the combination of views and downloads gives a more accurate picture of the interest in and usage of your publications than is reflected in download counts alone, particularly given the enhanced access readers have to your publications prior to download in the eScholarship interface.

UC Irvine Previously Published Works

For this month your total requests = 16429 (views=10788, downloads=5641).

Breakdown By Item

Top Ten Articles Viewed and Downloaded - July 2017
Item Year ---- Number of Requests ---- Total Added to
Title Published Views Downloads Requests "My Items"
Going to Pot? The Impact of Dispensary Closures on Crime 2017 202 26 228 0
Beyond Looking for My Penis: Reflections on Asian Gay Male Video Porn 1999 137 1 138 0
Creating Opportunities for Students to Show What They Know: The Role of Scaffolding in Assessment Tasks 2014 91 44 135 0
Corporate social responsibility as a source of employee satisfaction 2012 78 25 103 1
Enterprise Risk Management: Review, Critique, and Research Directions 2015 57 42 99 0
Theorizing Practice and Practicing Theory 2011 43 51 94 0
Climate and atmospheric history of the past 420,000 years from the Vostok ice core, Antarctica 1999 46 31 77 0
A Practice Theory Approach to Understanding the Interdependency of Nursing Practice and the Environment Implications for Nurse-Led Care Delivery Models 2015 49 22 71 0
Reconceptualizing Organizational Routines as a Source of Flexibility and Change 2003 41 30 71 0
An overview of polymyositis and dermatomyositis 2015 27 39 66 0

More information about the UC Open Access Policy is available on the 
Open Access Policy pages.

Visit the Implementation Plan to learn more about the timeline for systemwide roll-out of the publication management system.

What Happened to Google's Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books? - August 10, 2017

What Happened to Google's Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books?

By Jennifer Howard     Aug 10, 2017

edSurge: Postsecondary learning

"It was a crazy idea: Take the bulk of the world’s books, scan them, and create a monumental digital library for all to access. That’s what Google dreamed of doing when it embarked on its ambitious book-digitizing project in 2002. It got part of the way there, digitizing at least 25 million books from major university libraries.

But the promised library of everything hasn’t come into being. An epic legal battle between authors and publishers and the Internet giant over alleged copyright violations dragged on for years. A settlement that would have created a Book Rights Registry and made it possible to access the Google Books corpus through public-library terminals ultimately died, rejected by a federal judge in 2011. And though the same judge ultimately dismissed the case in 2013, handing Google a victory that allowed it to keep on scanning, the dream of easy and full access to all those works remains just that."

- more -

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for June 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for June 2017

Below is an overview of the number of views and downloads for this month, along with links to your usage numbers from previous months and additional data. We feel that the combination of views and downloads gives a more accurate picture of the interest in and usage of your publications than is reflected in download counts alone, particularly given the enhanced access readers have to your publications prior to download in the eScholarship interface.

UC Irvine Previously Published Works

For this month your total requests = 15818 (views=10339, downloads=5479).

Breakdown By Item

Top Ten Articles Viewed and Downloaded - June 2017
Item Year ---- Number of Requests ---- Total Added to
Title Published Views Downloads Requests "My Items"
Beyond Looking for My Penis: Reflections on Asian Gay Male Video Porn 1999 169 0 169 0
Enterprise Risk Management: Review, Critique, and Research Directions 2015 53 54 107 0
Primary production of the biosphere: integrating terrestrial and oceanic components 1998 52 38 90 0
Reconceptualizing Organizational Routines as a Source of Flexibility and Change 2003 49 30 79 0
Improving fluid intelligence with training on working memory: a meta-analysis 2014 36 32 68 0
Corporate social responsibility as a source of employee satisfaction 2012 42 24 66 0
Interdisciplinary collaboration: The role of the clinical nurse leader 2015 45 20 65 0
An overview of polymyositis and dermatomyositis 2015 24 40 64 0
Future CO2 Emissions and Climate Change from Existing Energy Infrastructure 2010 43 21 64 0
iPSC-Derived Human Microglia-like Cells to Study Neurological Diseases 2017 28 32 60 0

More information about the UC Open Access Policy is available on the 
Open Access Policy pages.

Visit the Implementation Plan to learn more about the timeline for systemwide roll-out of the publication management system.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Open Access and the Graduate Thesis Author - June 6, 2017

Citation: Jill Cirasella & Polly Thistlethwaite, (2017). "Open Access and the Graduate Author: A Dissertation Anxiety Manual," in Open Access and the Future of Scholarly Communication: Implementation, eds. K. L. Smith & K. A. Dickson (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield), p. 203-224.

Abstract: The process of completing a dissertation is stressful—deadlines are scary, editing is hard, formatting is tricky, and defending is terrifying. (And, of course, postgraduate employment is often uncertain.) Now that dissertations are deposited and distributed electronically, students must perform yet another anxiety-inducing task: deciding whether they want to make their dissertations immediately open access (OA) or, at universities that require OA, coming to terms with openness. For some students, mostly in the humanities and some of the social sciences, who hope to transform their dissertations into books, OA has become a bogeyman, a supposed saboteur of book contracts and destroyer of careers.

This chapter examines the various access-related anxieties that plague graduate students. It is a kind of diagnostic and statistical manual of dissertation anxieties—a "Dissertation Anxiety Manual," if you will—describing anxieties surrounding book contracts, book sales, plagiarism, juvenilia, the ambiguity of the term online, and changes in scholarly research and production.

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for May 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for May 2017

Below is an overview of the number of views and downloads for this month, along with links to your usage numbers from previous months and additional data. We feel that the combination of views and downloads gives a more accurate picture of the interest in and usage of your publications than is reflected in download counts alone, particularly given the enhanced access readers have to your publications prior to download in the eScholarship interface.

UC Irvine Previously Published Works

For this month your total requests = 19482 (views=12717, downloads=6765).

Breakdown By Item

Top Ten Articles Viewed and Downloaded - May 2017
Item Year ---- Number of Requests ---- Total Added to
Title Published Views Downloads Requests "My Items"
Beyond Looking for My Penis: Reflections on Asian Gay Male Video Porn 1999 181 1 182 0
The impact of laptop-free zones on student performance and attitudes in large lectures 2012 86 56 142 0
Enterprise Risk Management: Review, Critique, and Research Directions 2015 79 45 124 0
Primary production of the biosphere: integrating terrestrial and oceanic components 1998 67 43 110 0
Emotion and False Memory 2016 64 42 106 0
An overview of polymyositis and dermatomyositis 2015 54 38 92 0
Measurements of Wγ and Zγ production in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC 2013 90 0 90 0
A Practice Theory Approach to Understanding the Interdependency of Nursing Practice and the Environment Implications for Nurse-Led Care Delivery Models 2015 59 25 84 0
Reconceptualizing Organizational Routines as a Source of Flexibility and Change 2003 51 32 83 0
Corporate social responsibility as a source of employee satisfaction 2012 51 31 82 0

More information about the UC Open Access Policy is available on the 
Open Access Policy pages.

Visit the Implementation Plan to learn more about the timeline for systemwide roll-out of the publication management system.

Monday, May 8, 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for April 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for April 2017

Below is an overview of the number of views and downloads for this month, along with links to your usage numbers from previous months and additional data. We feel that the combination of views and downloads gives a more accurate picture of the interest in and usage of your publications than is reflected in download counts alone, particularly given the enhanced access readers have to your publications prior to download in the eScholarship interface.

UC Irvine Previously Published Works

For this month your total requests = 18786 (views=12031, downloads=6755).

Breakdown By Item

Top Ten Articles Viewed and Downloaded - April 2017
Item Year ---- Number of Requests ---- Total Added to
Title Published Views Downloads Requests "My Items"
Beyond Looking for My Penis: Reflections on Asian Gay Male Video Porn 1999 248 1 249 0
Enterprise Risk Management: Review, Critique, and Research Directions 2015 84 63 147 0
Corporate social responsibility as a source of employee satisfaction 2012 63 26 89 1
Evaluation of the probe 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin as an indicator of reactive oxygen species formation and oxidative stress 1992 41 45 86 0
Primary production of the biosphere: integrating terrestrial and oceanic components 1998 50 35 85 0
Emotion and False Memory 2016 52 32 84 0
Reconceptualizing Organizational Routines as a Source of Flexibility and Change 2003 52 27 79 0
Future CO2 Emissions and Climate Change from Existing Energy Infrastructure 2010 49 29 78 0
A Practice Theory Approach to Understanding the Interdependency of Nursing Practice and the Environment Implications for Nurse-Led Care Delivery Models 2015 46 31 77 0
False memories in highly superior autobiographical memory individuals 2013 49 25 74 0

More information about the UC Open Access Policy is available on the 
Open Access Policy pages.

Visit the Implementation Plan to learn more about the timeline for systemwide roll-out of the publication management system.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

OCLC Research report on "The Realities of Research Data Management" - April 18, 2017

OCLC Research recently released the first report in a four part series entitled “The Realities of Research Data Management.” Additional webinars & reports will be following in the coming months. 

More information about OCLC Research investigations into research data management is available at http://www.oclc.org/research/themes/research-collections/rdm.html.

Thursday, April 13, 2017

De Gruyter sponsors Directory of Open Access Books - April 13, 2017

De Gruyter sponsors DOAB
 

We are very pleased to announce that De Gruyter has decided to become a sponsor of the Directory of Open Access Books. With this sponsorship, De Gruyter celebrates the launch of the De Gruyter Open Access Book Library on degruyter.com. The Open Access Book Library is intended to draw attention to the growing number – and growing importance – of open access books. Of the almost 900 titles in the Library, approximately half are De Gruyter titles. The other half is supplied by publishing partners, but available on degruyter.com. This makes De Gruyter the largest independent publisher of original content open access books in the humanities.

“In 2005, De Gruyter was one of the first traditional publishers to offer open access books, we have continued to marry our centuries-old expertise in book publishing with our ability to provide open access models to the research and scholarly community,” said Dr. Anke Beck, Managing Director, De Gruyter. “As a part of the run up to celebrating 1000 titles later this year, we are very pleased to confirm our commitment to making open access book publishing a success by sponsoring DOAB.”

We are happy to say that DOAB is doing very well. Earlier this month, DOAB passed the milestone of 6000 listed OA books. In 2016 the list of OA books grew with over fifty percent for the third consecutive year, and DOAB continues to top the list of referral sites. Starting this year, DOAB is taking part in a European Horizon 2020 project (HIRMEOS), to develop a certification service for OA book publishers. The project will also add new features to DOAB: listing OA chapters of books and automated uploading of OA titles by publishers.


Thursday, April 6, 2017

POST: The Realities of Research Data Management

In a post on hangingtogether.org, Brian Lavoie (OCLC) announces the release of “A Tour of the Research Data Management (RDM) Service Space”, the first report in a series entitled “The Realities of Research Data Management” produced by OCLC Research. The series “explores the context and choices research universities face in building or acquiring RDM capacity,” and this first installment serves as an introduction.

RDM is both an opportunity and a challenge for many research universities. But research data management is not a discrete, well-defined service, and RDM solutions are not of the one-size-fits-all variety. Moving beyond recognition of RDM’s importance requires facing the realities of research data management. Each institution must shape its local RDM service offering by navigating several key inflection points: deciding to act, deciding what to do, and deciding how to do it. Future reports in this series will examine these decisions in the context of the choices made by the case study partners.

The additional reports in the series will be cover Scoping the Local RDM Service Offering, Understanding the Institutional Incentives for RDM Services, and Sourcing and Scaling RDM Services, and will be released on the OCLC Research website.

View article...

The California Digital Library Supports the Initiative for Open Citations - April 6, 2017

The California Digital Library (CDL) is proud to announce our formal endorsement for the Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC). CDL has long supported free and reusable scholarly work, as well as organizations and initiatives supporting citations in publication. With a growing database of literature and research data citations, there is a need for an open global network of citation data.
The Initiative for Open Citations will work with Crossref and their Cited-by service to open up all references indexed in Crossref. Many publishers and stakeholders have opted in to participate in opening up their citation data, and we hope that each year this list will grow to encompass all fields of publication. Furthermore, we are looking forward to seeing how research data citations will be a part of this discussion.

CDL is a firm believer in and advocate for data citations and persistent identifiers in scholarly work. However, if research publications are cited and those citations are not freely accessible and searchable- our goal is not accomplished. We are proud to support the Initiative for Open Citations and invite you to get in touch with any questions you may have about the need for open citations or ways to be an advocate for this necessary change.

Below are some Frequently Asked Questions about the need, ways to get involved, and misconceptions regarding citations. The answers are provided by the Board and founders of the I4OC Initiative:

I am a scholarly publisher not enrolled in the Cited-by service. How do I enable it?
If not already a participant in Cited-by, a Crossref member can register for this service free-of-charge. Having done so, there is nothing further the publisher needs to do to ‘open’ its reference data, other than to give its consent to Crossref, since participation in Cited-by alone does not automatically make these references available via Crossref’s standard APIs.

I am a scholarly publisher already depositing references to Crossref. How do I publicly release them?
We encourage all publishers to make their reference metadata publicly available. If you are already submitting article metadata to Crossref as a participant in their Cited-by service, opening them can be achieved in a matter of days. Publishers can easily and freely achieve this:
  • either by contacting Crossref support directly by e-mail, asking them to turn on reference distribution for all of the relevant DOI prefixes;
  • or by themselves setting the < reference_distribution_opt > metadata element to “ any ” for each DOI deposit for which they want to make references openly available.
How do I access open citation data?
Once made open, the references for individual scholarly publications may be accessed immediately through the Crossref REST API.
Open citations are also available from the OpenCitations Corpus , a database created to house scholarly citations, that is progressively and systematically harvested citation data from Crossref and other sources. An advantage of accessing citation data from the OpenCitations Corpus is that they are available in standards-compliant machine-readable RDF format , and include information about both incoming and outgoing citations of bibliographic resources (published articles and books).

Does this initiative cover future citations only or also historical data?
Both. All DOIs under a prefix set for open reference distribution will have open references through Crossref, for past, present, and future publications.
Past and present publications that lack DOIs are not dealt with by Crossref, and gaining access to their citation data will require separate initiatives by their publishers or others to extract and openly publish those references.

Under what licensing terms is citation data being made available?
Crossref exposes article and reference metadata without a license, since it regards these as raw facts that cannot be licensed.
The structured citation metadata within the OpenCitations Corpus are published under a Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication, to make it explicitly clear that these data are open.

My journal is open access. Aren’t its articles’ citations automatically available?
No. Although Open Access articles may be open and freely available to read on the publisher’s website, their references are not separate, and are not necessarily structured or accessible programmatically. Additionally, although their reference metadata may be submitted to Crossref, Crossref historically set the default for references to “closed,” with a manual opt-in being required for public references. Many publisher members have not been aware that they could simply instruct Crossref to make references open, and, as a neutral party, Crossref has not promoted the public reference option. All publishers therefore have to opt in to open distribution of references via Crossref.

Is there a programmatic way to check whether a publisher’s or journal’s citation data is free to reuse?
For Crossref metadata , their REST API reveals how many and which publishers have opened references. Any system or tool (or a JSON viewer) can be pointed to this query: http://api.crossref.org/members?filter=has-public-references:true&rows=1000 to show the count and the list of publishers with “ public-references “: true .
To query a specific publisher’s status, use, for example:
http://api.crossref.org/members?filter=has-public-references:true&rows=1000&qu ery=springer then find the tag for public-references. In some cases it will be set to false.

Contact
You can contact the founding group by e-mail at: info@i4oc.org .


View article...

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for March 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for March 2017

Below is an overview of the number of views and downloads for this month, along with links to your usage numbers from previous months and additional data. We feel that the combination of views and downloads gives a more accurate picture of the interest in and usage of your publications than is reflected in download counts alone, particularly given the enhanced access readers have to your publications prior to download in the eScholarship interface.

UC Irvine Previously Published Works

For this month your total requests = 20199 (views=13064, downloads=7135).

Breakdown By Item

Top Ten Articles Viewed and Downloaded - March 2017
Item Year ---- Number of Requests ---- Total Added to
Title Published Views Downloads Requests "My Items"
Beyond Looking for My Penis: Reflections on Asian Gay Male Video Porn 1999 249 2 251 0
The impact of laptop-free zones on student performance and attitudes in large lectures 2012 93 58 151 0
Enterprise Risk Management: Review, Critique, and Research Directions 2015 72 64 136 0
How Psychological Bias Shapes Accounting and Financial Regulation 2017 98 37 135 0
Primary production of the biosphere: integrating terrestrial and oceanic components 1998 70 55 125 0
Corporate social responsibility as a source of employee satisfaction 2012 78 32 110 1
A Practice Theory Approach to Understanding the Interdependency of Nursing Practice and the Environment Implications for Nurse-Led Care Delivery Models 2015 63 40 103 0
Evaluation of the probe 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin as an indicator of reactive oxygen species formation and oxidative stress 1992 66 32 98 0
Item-wording and the dimensionality of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: Do they matter? 2003 64 33 97 0
Future CO2 Emissions and Climate Change from Existing Energy Infrastructure 2010 55 37 92 0

More information about the UC Open Access Policy is available on the Open Access Policy pages.

Visit the Implementation Plan to learn more about the timeline for systemwide roll-out of the publication management system.

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

New Open Toolkit for Teaching File and Data Management - April 4, 2017

The ETD+ Toolkit (https://educopia.org/publications/etdplustoolkit) is an approach to improving student and faculty research output management. Focusing on the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) as a mile-marker in a student’s research trajectory, it provides in-time advice to students and faculty about avoiding common digital loss scenarios for the ETD and all of its affiliated files.

The ETD+ Toolkit provides free introductory training resources on crucial data curation and digital longevity techniques. It has been designed as a training series to help students and faculty identify and offset risks and threats to their digital research footprints.

About the Toolkit
The ETD+ Toolkit is the result of a project funded by the Institute of Library and Museum Services. Educopia Institute led the creation of the Toolkit in partnership with the NDLTD, ProQuest, bepress, and 12 U.S. research libraries.


What it is:
An open set of six modules and evaluation instruments that prepare students to create, store, and maintain their research outputs on durable devices and in durable formats. Each is designed to stand alone; they may also be used as a series.

What each module includes:
Each module includes Learning Objectives, a one-page Handout, a Guidance Brief, a Slideshow with full presenter notes, and an evaluation Survey. Each module is released under a CC-BY license and all elements are openly editable to make reuse as easy as possible.

Who it is for:
Anyone may freely adopt and adapt this toolkit. We especially recommend its use by administrators, faculty, and librarians teaching students and by students seeking practical advice about digital content management.  

Give us feedback (Please)
Like the modules? Hate them? Think they’re unique? Redundant? Because these materials have been produced under a grant-funded project, we are requesting feedback that we can share with our funder and that we can use to improve the Toolkit. Please help us to refine the workshops and report back to our funder about how and where they are being used. Contact katherine@educopia.org and sam@educopia.org.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Gates Foundation joins shift towards open access platforms - March 23, 2017

Initiative will emulate Wellcome Trust’s publishing model, with European Commission set to follow


"One of the world’s biggest funders of scientific research is to establish an open access platform that will allow its grant winners to publish their findings, in a move that could be swiftly followed by the European Commission.
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which invests about $1.2 billion (£960 million) a year in global health initiatives, said on 23 March that the Gates Open Research initiative would allow researchers funded by the US charity to publish their work on a free-to-access site, beginning this autumn.
The service will be provided by F1000, which launched a similar platform for the Wellcome Trust, the world’s largest biomedical charity, in November 2016."

More:  https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/gates-foundation-joins-shift-towards-open-access-platforms


F1000 built a similar platform for the Wellcome Trust (https://wellcome.ac.uk/press-release/wellcome-launch-bold-publishing-initiative) in November 2016.

Wellcome Open Research

Monday, March 20, 2017

Three University of California campuses add their signature to OA2020’s Expression of Interest

The University of California, Berkeley, UC Davis, and UC San Francisco took a major step today towards the goal of making all scholarly journal literature freely available to the world by endorsing the international open access (OA) initiative, OA2020, led by Max Planck Digital Library.  The three UCs join the only other United States institution having signed on to OA2020’s Expression of Interest (EoI) to date, California State University, Northridge.

OA2020 is an international movement to convert the entire corpus of scholarly journal literature to open access by the year 2020. The OA2020 movement intends to accomplish this transition or “flipping” by encouraging institutions to convert resources currently spent on journal subscriptions into funds that support sustainable OA business models. It does not prescribe a particular model for the flipping, since that can vary by institution. Rather, OA2020 provides flexibility for institutions to define for themselves how to repurpose their journal subscription funds in support of OA publishing.

Faculty, administration, and library leaders from the three universities see enormous potential in the goals set out by the initiative to break down historic and financial barriers to journal access, and thereby serve society as centers of higher learning transmitting knowledge openly and freely. UC Berkeley, UC Davis and UCSF worked together to sign the OA2020 EoI before the Berlin 13 conference in Germany on March 21-22 this week. The campuses also put together the site OA2020.us to offer their perspectives about why they signed, and to provide resources for other institutions who want consider what OA2020 might mean for their institutions as well.

To read more, see UC Berkeley’s press release and UCSF’s press release. Have questions? Please contact us at the email address via the OA2020.us site.

Rachael Samberg |
Scholarly Communication Officer | The Library | University of California, Berkeley

Michael Wolfe |
Scholarly Communications Officer | UC Davis Library

Anneliese Taylor |

Assistant Director, Scholarly Communications & Collections | UCSF Library