Thursday, August 17, 2017

Film of session from Text and Data Mining symposium - Engineering Department at Cambridge University - August 2017

Blog description of symposium held at Cambridge on Text and Data Mining - Cambridge University
 https://unlockingresearch.blog.lib.cam.ac.uk/?p=1505

Sometimes the best way to find a solution is to just get the different stakeholders talking to each other – and this what happened at a recent Text and Data Mining symposium held in the Engineering Department at Cambridge. The attendees were primarily postgraduate students and early career researchers, but senior researchers, administrative staff, librarians and publishers were also represented in the audience. This symposium grew out of a discussion held earlier this year at Cambridge to consider the issue of TDM and what a TDM library service might look like at Cambridge.
The day concluded with the group reconvening together for a roundtable (which was filmed) to discuss the broader issue of why there is not more TDM happening in the UK
What was clear was something I have repeatedly observed over the past few years – that the players in this space including librarians, researchers and publishers, have very little idea of how the others work and their needs. I have actually heard people say: ‘If only they understood…’

Dr Danny Kingsley
Head, Office of Scholarly Communication
Cambridge University Library

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Center for Open Science Launches Thesis Commons, an Open-source Platform for Theses and Dissertations

Charlottesville, VA
The Center for Open Science (COS) is pleased to announce the release of Thesis Commons, a free, cloud-based, open-source platform for the submission, dissemination, and discovery of graduate and undergraduate theses and dissertations from any discipline. Authors can share their electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) with a quick and easy submission workflow.  Readers can search, discover, and download with a clean and simple interface. Institutions can sign-up for a branded version of the service for their institutional community for hosting ETDs, preprints, or other scholarship.  
Thesis Commons in part of  a rapidly growing community of open scholarly communication services built on an open-source infrastructure called the Open Science Framework (OSF).  As a shared, public good, the OSF dramatically lowers the barrier to entry for communities to introduce and operate services across the research lifecycle such as preprints, ETD repositories, and data or materials archives.  With a planned integration of a peer review service layer, communities will be able to moderate these services directly and operate discipline-specific repositories or journals with a common integrated infrastructure.  
COS aims to facilitate open and accessible scholarly communication services that promote community-driven innovation and customization in the scholarly workflow. “Thousands of researchers at hundreds of institutions are using the OSF to organize, collaborate, and improve discovery of active research projects,” said Matt Spitzer, COS Community Manager. “The OSF also enables open, community-led interfaces for sharing preprints and papers. Institutions are looking for more integrated, open-source services to host their community’s research outputs. By bringing Thesis Commons and institutionally-branded repositories together, we will dramatically improve discovery and reduce preservation costs.”
Thesis Commons has a steering committee of experts and advocates for open scholarship representing institution, library, and researcher stakeholder communities.  Members include Bradly Alicea from the OpenWorm Foundation, Gail Clement from the California Institute of Technology, John Finnell from Los Alamos Laboratory, Amanda French from GWU, Jon Grahe from Pacific Lutheran University, Sridhar Gutam from Indian Council of Agricultural Research, Chris Hartgerink from Tilburg University, Thea Lindquist from University of Colorado, Boulder, Gail McMillan from Virginia Tech, Gustav Nilsonne from Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, and Fred Smyth from the University of Virginia.
Thesis Commons is also backed by COS’s preservation fund, which ensures that all data stored on its services would be preserved and accessible for 50+ years in the event of COS curtailing or closing its services. Moreover, because all COS-built software is open-source, other groups could maintain and operate the service in COS’s absence.
For more information on Thesis Commons or to discuss implementation at your institution, please reach out to us here or contact Matt Spitzer at matt.spitzer@cos.io.
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About Center for Open Science
The Center for Open Science (COS) is a non-profit technology startup founded in 2013 with a mission to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. COS pursues this mission by building communities around open science practices, supporting metascience research, and developing and maintaining free, open source software tools. The Open Science Framework (OSF), COS’s flagship product, is a web application that connects and supports the research workflow, enabling scientists to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of their research. Researchers use the OSF to collaborate, document, archive, share, and register research projects, materials, and data. Learn more at cos.io and osf.io.
Contacts for the Center for Open Science
Media: Rusty Speidel: rusty@cos.io | 434-284-3403
Starting a Branded Service: Matt Spitzer: matt.spitzer@cos.io

Blog Discussion: Planning scholarly communication training in the UK - June 2017

A new Blog on Unlocking Research from the U.K.

"Planning scholarly communication training in the UK”

A summary:


In June 2017 ,a group of people met in London to discuss the issues around scholarly communication training delivery in the UK. Representatives from RLUK, UKSG, SCONUL, UKCoRR, Vitae, Jisc and some universities had a workshop to discuss how to address the problem. Although the discussion was very library-centric, the need for  training outside the library sector is the emphasis of the blog discussion. This blog is a summary of the discussion from that day.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eSchoalrship for July 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for July 2017

Below is an overview of the number of views and downloads for this month, along with links to your usage numbers from previous months and additional data. We feel that the combination of views and downloads gives a more accurate picture of the interest in and usage of your publications than is reflected in download counts alone, particularly given the enhanced access readers have to your publications prior to download in the eScholarship interface.

UC Irvine Previously Published Works

For this month your total requests = 16429 (views=10788, downloads=5641).

Breakdown By Item

Top Ten Articles Viewed and Downloaded - July 2017
Item Year ---- Number of Requests ---- Total Added to
Title Published Views Downloads Requests "My Items"
Going to Pot? The Impact of Dispensary Closures on Crime 2017 202 26 228 0
Beyond Looking for My Penis: Reflections on Asian Gay Male Video Porn 1999 137 1 138 0
Creating Opportunities for Students to Show What They Know: The Role of Scaffolding in Assessment Tasks 2014 91 44 135 0
Corporate social responsibility as a source of employee satisfaction 2012 78 25 103 1
Enterprise Risk Management: Review, Critique, and Research Directions 2015 57 42 99 0
Theorizing Practice and Practicing Theory 2011 43 51 94 0
Climate and atmospheric history of the past 420,000 years from the Vostok ice core, Antarctica 1999 46 31 77 0
A Practice Theory Approach to Understanding the Interdependency of Nursing Practice and the Environment Implications for Nurse-Led Care Delivery Models 2015 49 22 71 0
Reconceptualizing Organizational Routines as a Source of Flexibility and Change 2003 41 30 71 0
An overview of polymyositis and dermatomyositis 2015 27 39 66 0

More information about the UC Open Access Policy is available on the 
Open Access Policy pages.

Visit the Implementation Plan to learn more about the timeline for systemwide roll-out of the publication management system.

What Happened to Google's Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books? - August 10, 2017

What Happened to Google's Effort to Scan Millions of University Library Books?

By Jennifer Howard     Aug 10, 2017

edSurge: Postsecondary learning

"It was a crazy idea: Take the bulk of the world’s books, scan them, and create a monumental digital library for all to access. That’s what Google dreamed of doing when it embarked on its ambitious book-digitizing project in 2002. It got part of the way there, digitizing at least 25 million books from major university libraries.

But the promised library of everything hasn’t come into being. An epic legal battle between authors and publishers and the Internet giant over alleged copyright violations dragged on for years. A settlement that would have created a Book Rights Registry and made it possible to access the Google Books corpus through public-library terminals ultimately died, rejected by a federal judge in 2011. And though the same judge ultimately dismissed the case in 2013, handing Google a victory that allowed it to keep on scanning, the dream of easy and full access to all those works remains just that."

- more -

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for June 2017

Top Ten UC Irvine Articles Accessed in eScholarship for June 2017

Below is an overview of the number of views and downloads for this month, along with links to your usage numbers from previous months and additional data. We feel that the combination of views and downloads gives a more accurate picture of the interest in and usage of your publications than is reflected in download counts alone, particularly given the enhanced access readers have to your publications prior to download in the eScholarship interface.

UC Irvine Previously Published Works

For this month your total requests = 15818 (views=10339, downloads=5479).

Breakdown By Item

Top Ten Articles Viewed and Downloaded - June 2017
Item Year ---- Number of Requests ---- Total Added to
Title Published Views Downloads Requests "My Items"
Beyond Looking for My Penis: Reflections on Asian Gay Male Video Porn 1999 169 0 169 0
Enterprise Risk Management: Review, Critique, and Research Directions 2015 53 54 107 0
Primary production of the biosphere: integrating terrestrial and oceanic components 1998 52 38 90 0
Reconceptualizing Organizational Routines as a Source of Flexibility and Change 2003 49 30 79 0
Improving fluid intelligence with training on working memory: a meta-analysis 2014 36 32 68 0
Corporate social responsibility as a source of employee satisfaction 2012 42 24 66 0
Interdisciplinary collaboration: The role of the clinical nurse leader 2015 45 20 65 0
An overview of polymyositis and dermatomyositis 2015 24 40 64 0
Future CO2 Emissions and Climate Change from Existing Energy Infrastructure 2010 43 21 64 0
iPSC-Derived Human Microglia-like Cells to Study Neurological Diseases 2017 28 32 60 0

More information about the UC Open Access Policy is available on the 
Open Access Policy pages.

Visit the Implementation Plan to learn more about the timeline for systemwide roll-out of the publication management system.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Open Access and the Graduate Thesis Author - June 6, 2017

Citation: Jill Cirasella & Polly Thistlethwaite, (2017). "Open Access and the Graduate Author: A Dissertation Anxiety Manual," in Open Access and the Future of Scholarly Communication: Implementation, eds. K. L. Smith & K. A. Dickson (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield), p. 203-224.

Abstract: The process of completing a dissertation is stressful—deadlines are scary, editing is hard, formatting is tricky, and defending is terrifying. (And, of course, postgraduate employment is often uncertain.) Now that dissertations are deposited and distributed electronically, students must perform yet another anxiety-inducing task: deciding whether they want to make their dissertations immediately open access (OA) or, at universities that require OA, coming to terms with openness. For some students, mostly in the humanities and some of the social sciences, who hope to transform their dissertations into books, OA has become a bogeyman, a supposed saboteur of book contracts and destroyer of careers.

This chapter examines the various access-related anxieties that plague graduate students. It is a kind of diagnostic and statistical manual of dissertation anxieties—a "Dissertation Anxiety Manual," if you will—describing anxieties surrounding book contracts, book sales, plagiarism, juvenilia, the ambiguity of the term online, and changes in scholarly research and production.